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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,997 (some duplicates have been removed)
by increase in tension between japan and china over which country owns the islands in the east china sea. and they're concerned the conflicting flames allowed to fester, it could unsettle the dynamic in the region. they want to see security policies and sophisticated diplomacy to calm the situation. u.s. leaders are worried of being drawn into a military confrontation because of their alliance with japan. >> our message to the new japanese government is the same assed to former japanese government, is that we want to see both japan and china avoid provocative acts. we want to see them talk to each other and work this through by dialogue. >> reporter: now japan is tied up in another territorial dispute with south korea. u.s. officials would like to see japanese put aside their differences in the islands in the sea of japan. american diplomats rely on partners in both countries to contain the threat of north korea. as we saw last week, north korea may well be on the way to gaining technology on long-range missile. president obama said the alliance serves as cornerstone in asia-pacific. res
of the attention is on china. the north's most influential ally. today on china report, we look at the response from leaders in bejing and what motivates their longstanding relationship with an isolated regime. >> reporter: chinese media were quick to respond to the rocket launch. tv networks ran a news clip using reports by foreign news agencies. but it took a full six hours for the chinese government to issue a formal comment. it was made during the regular press conference of the foreign ministry. >> translator: it's regrettable that north korea went ahead with the launch, despite the international's community close attention. as a member of the united nations, the north has the obligation to respect security council resolutions. >> reporter: china is north korea's neighbor and the most important of its fuel lines, also an economic superpower, since fighting the korean war together, the two countries have maintained close relations. in september, north korea held a briefing in beijing, calling for massive investment in a special economic zone. shape, and the only way it will improve is thro
is on china. the north's most influential ally. today on china report, we look at the response from leaders in bejing and what motivates their longstanding relationship with an isolated regime. >> reporter: chinese media were quick to respond to the rocket launch. tv networks ran a news clip using reports by foreign news agencies. but it took a full six hours for the chinese government to issue a formal comment.ititititititit press conference of the foreign ministry. >> translator: it's regrettable that north korea went ahead with the launch, despite the international's community close attention. as a member of the united nations, the north has the obligation to respect security council resolutions. >> reporter: china is north korea's neighbor and the most important of its fuel lines, also an economic superpower, since fighting the korean war together, the two countries have maintained close relations. in september, north korea held a briefing in beijing, calling for massive investment in a special economic zone. the north's economy is in dire shape, and the only way it will improve is thr
. this is his book, "oss in china prelude to cold war." professor, where are you from originally? >> i originally came from china. the city was the wartime capital of china. that's for all the major players in the book stay, and so since my childhood, i was intrigued by a lot of things. the oss was the wartime intelligence office. the reason why i couldn't write a book like this was because a late 1980s, bill casey who was the president of ronald reagan's cia director, he was also a history buff, decided to want to open up all the oss operation files. no one in the world had done it. you open up your own intelligence days of the entire operation file. that's amazing. so now it's at the national archives in college park, maryland. it's a gigantic record file. it has about 8000 feet of files. so i delved into this and i found some of the fascinating stuff. so i decided to write the book, and the book was first published in 1997 on the 50th anniversary of the cia. so it sold relatively well, and then 9/11 happened, and interesting intelligence organization, but then people were overwhelmi
on stability in the asia-pacific. they have been troubled by increasing tension between japan and china over which country owns the senkaku islands in the east china sea. their concerned thathe conflict i claims allowed to fester could unsettled dynamic in the region. they want to see policies and sophisticated diplomacy to calm the swaituation. they're drawn into military confrontation because of their alliance with japan. >> our message to the new japanese government will be the same as the message to the former japanese government, which is that we want to see both japan and china avoid provocative acts. we want to see them talk to each other and work this through by dialogue. >> now japan has stirred up another territorial dispute with south korea. u.s. official want up to see the japanese put aside the differences with the neighbor about the islands in the sea of japan. american diplomats rely on partner in both countries about the threat of north korea. the north koreans may be under way to gain technology for long rage ballistic missiles. they say it serves as the cornerstone of peace
we're really engaging diplomatically with china and other members of united nations security council on tougher resolutions and possibly sanctions. >> making any progress? >> you have to talk to the ambassadors in new york and the sea to figure out what is going on. -- d.c. to figure out what is going on. >> in beijing, what is the view among the leaders you can tell of kim jong-u7n? -- kim jong-un? >> china would like all the parties that are part of this sixth party talks her to get back to the table, to see if we can encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold. that is a difference of opinion of strategy. china really believes we ought to be engaged with north korea. united states feels every time we've tried to engage with north korea, they basically turnaround and failed to respond. >> what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you every day? >> the want greater cooperation with united states, because the understand how important united states is for their own economy.
counterparts from china, as well japan and south korea. he said he hopes the chinese can use their influence with their allies in pyongyang. u.s. diplomats have made similar warnings over the years and the north koreans have ignored them. >> reporter: the ballistic missile launch will be the second since kim jong-un took pow area year ago. it will use the same launch pad at a site in the northwestern part of the country. before the first test in april, officials in pyongyang said the 30-meter, three-stage rocket was meant to carry a satellite. but japan, the united states and south korea said the launch was in fact a ballistic missile test. the test ended in failure with the rocket exploding in midair two minutes after liftoff. it broke into more than ten pieces and fell into the ocean. analysts say north korea's young leader kim jong-un wants to correct this failure before his first anniversary of his father's death on december 17th. kim may also be trying to consolidate his power base by showing his dedication to a may 31st policy. kim has also vowed to develop north korea's economy. >> tr
of course. so trying to -- china is a much interest in canadian energy and natural resources. we are very much interested in building trust, strategic trust and cooperation with china. and from enable perspective, of course, i'll give you one sort of anecdote. you were referring to this the islands, two months ago i attended the western pacific naval symposium hosted -- and have the opportunity to sit between the deputy commander of the people's liberation army navy, and the commander of the ambassadors japanese maritime self-defense force, a euphemism for the japanese navy. it was at a time when the island was leading on cnn and bbc. i thought as i was sitting between two them there's an opportunity for a canadian to do something extraordinary from an naval diplomatic perspective and put this thing to bed. [laughter] >> how did that go? >> not too well, not too well. [laughter] which is my point. i spoke with the chinese admirals interpreter. i spoke with admiral commander in english, a great conversation. but never was the bridge build or even considered. and i think one of the key issu
in my lifetime with respect to broad openings in china. a, diplomatic openings. the ones who want to recognize china will abide by the one china policy. the economic doors that have taken china to a relatively small economy to the second largest in the world. and 3, primacy of the party with its 80 million members and 3000 outposts in the world. now you have xi jinping rising to power. he has been given the party mantle and soon the military and the presidency. before him will be new questions much different from the ones that deng xiaoping was responsible for acting upon. before xi jinping will be questions like, is china more repressive at home today than in earlier years. is china more nationalistic in its economic practices, but jiggly those among the enterprises? has china become more assertive internationally? i would argue east of these questions carried fairly profound rule of law implications. as xi jinping rises to take the top position in china and wrestles with new challenges and attempts to answer any questions, i would argue that many of them are based in basic rule
its territory. an airplane from china's maritime authorities intruded into japan's airspace over the senkaku islands. that's in the east china sea. jets were scrambled to the scene. japan controls the senkaku islands, china and taiwan claimed them. the japan coast guard says one of its vessels spotted the plane thursday morning and reported it to japan's defense ministry. it was about 15 kilometers south of the uotsuri islands. part of the senkaku island chain. the minister says eight f-15 fighters from the air self defense force based in okinawa were dispatched in response. but when they arrived the chinese plane had already left japanese airspace. the coast guard photo of the chinese aircraft shows letters on the plane's body indicating it belongs to china's state oceanic administration. the defense ministry says this was the first such intrusion by a chinese aircraft since the self-defense forces began keeping records. the coast guard says the plane was initially spotted around 10:40 a.m. local time. coast guard officials confirmed the intrusion at 11:06 and the plane moved ou
it was received. my relation to china -- i went with a professor who went to china. the press said -- what are you doing? >> i said i am writing a book. "china, yesterday, today, and tomorrow." but i did go over there. [laughter] there are about 600 of them and they speak english. it is like talking to a group in texas. there is no problem in understanding how the system works. exactly what they said. how do we get from here to there? to which my response is, i do not know. that is a problem for you to solve, i cannot do it. what is it that they seem to be interested in? it is so obvious. do you think this rule of law has been given on day one and suddenly it was followed? of course not. do not think democracy will solve them. it is both your friend and your enemies. hamilton and madison right the document. it is a very good document. ask any of us on the courts, we would be in agreement on the basic things. the basic framework is it creates institutions of democracy. people can decide for themselves what kinds of community they want it is a special kind of democracy. it is a democracy that protec
be spent outside of the plan area. prioritized spending $9 million in china town area. that was done for a couple of reasons, many of which have been discussed in the hearings leading up to this conversation. essentially that china town is the densest in san francisco, the most open space poor, as you often hear in our conversations here, and that the analysis the planning department did indicated much of the spillover from increased density created by the new housing and new office space in the plan area would affect not just the downtown and south of market by china town. what is before you today is affirming and supporting what the planning commission did on october 18th. to prioritize spending those impact fees in the china town neighborhood. i want to note quickly the ipic committee on which the rec department has a seat is body charged with the actually allocation of those fees. i believe we talked a little about that in the september hearing but happy to answer more questions on that, as necessary. >> is there any public comment on this item? please come forward. >> good morni
would not yield in territorial fight with china and would increase defense spending if necessary. at the same time, he said he would do more to mend economic ties. he said if deflation persists he might delay the hike in the consumption tax. he has piled the pressure on the central bank to do more to ease monetary policy. he has said the government policy of phasing out nuclear power by the 2030s is unrealistic and irresponsible. >> so how about all these new parties that we're hearing about? >> well, voters who are tired of the establishment could support what are known as the third force. former tokyo governor shintaro ishihara leads the restoration party. its candidates are asking voters why they would return power to the ldp simply because they are dissatisfied with the dpj. restoration party candidates promised that they would change japan fundamentally. they have attracted followers with promises to lessen the role of government and promote more free-market competition. but, you know, we are only on day one, so we are going to have to wait and see how all these factors play
for his administration. nhk world, tokyo. >>> china is building up its military presence in the asia pacific region. the question is how southeast asian countries will need with the neighbor's growing clout. we have details on different positions two countries are taking on china. >> nhk has obtained information that sheds light on the stances they are taking on china and we start with the philippines which is stationing marines on the spratly islands. nhk world reports. >> reporter: the philippines and china and malaysia and brunei claim sovereignty over all or some of the spratly's, high ranking military officers say their country has started to deploy marines in nine islands and shoals since september. the country had already stationed naval officers there. the military says personal numbers have almost doubled on some of the islands. before the deployment, the marines underwent training on protecting the islands and been equipped with upgraded weapons. philippines began expanding its military facility on the island to accommodate equipment and personnel for drills and other opera
and recreation in china town. the committee is a voluntary organization that has worked with the commission of open space issues over 40 years. we starred in 1969 despite attempt business a developer to turn a playground into a garage. i'm here to speak on the proposed regulation regarding prioritis for the transbay open space impact fees. we are recognized as a es for the transbay open space impact fees. we are recognized as a high needs neighborhood. 40% of our stock in china town is made up of sro units, single room occupancy units that are eight-by-ten. there is barely enough room for a bed. when there is a bed it is standing room only. there is no bathroom in there. no kitchen. there's no closet. if you need to go to the bathroom you need to take with you a flashlight. take with you toll let paper and towels. maybe you need to take with you alcohol or other cleaning solution to clean the toilet. if you leave your toilet paper or soap, somebody is going to take it or steal it. you cannot cook in your unit because there's no kitchen. you have to use a community kitchen. sometimes it does
and this brings back sweet memories of when china was very isolated during the cold war. in the end, there's a whole new generation of people who have been much more sophisticated understanding, but that i would say it's a very strong autonomic response to the united states beefing up its forces in australia and then they wake up one morning and burma has flipped on them. it was eternal in terms of their faithful allies. these things caused a lot of consternation. so the old fear of diagnostically speaking in china is to fear with sand and travel without. these things happening around them excite them. >> how much does it add to that anxiety is that all? >> is the most problematic relationship now in japan and this is not good. i have to say i think japan probably hasn't played this as well as it might have, but i think on the other hand it would be fair to say also that it serves china's purposes to have something happening outside his orders which can rally people at home. there's a lot of complex things going on in each of these reactions to foreign movements outside. >> which ma
nations need to isolate the president and su. >> we have two ways -- putting pressure on russia, china and iran to stop supporting this regime, and then this would be useful, or supporting militarily the opposition or the interfering by the nato to make free zone and no-fly zone. >> reporter: russia and china have repeatedly vetoed u.n. security council resolutions on imposing sanctions against syria. without their support, the international efforts can only put limited pressure on president assad. diplomats here are still hoping their efforts will help in some part to end the conflict in syria. however, after 20 months of violence, they've learned getting peace will take time. akira saheki, nhk world, tokyo. >>> satellite images show north korea could be preparing to launch another rocket. researchers at johns hopkins university in the united states say they have observed the first two stages of what appears to be a long-range missile. these images of the launch site in tongchang-ri on the west coast of north korea were captured on monday. researchers say they show trailers carrying t
on greenhouse grasses in growing countries such as china and india. they're currently not committed to targets. representatives from china, the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases, said the country has done its share. they note that during the first nine months of 2012 china's energy consumption fell by 3.4% from the previous year. >> translator: we made a commitment at our party congress. we prioritized building and eco friendly society. we'll make a strong effort to promote a recycle-based society. china will act on climate change with other nations. >> some delegates also want reassurance on financial support. wealthy countries have pledged to provide $100 billion per year in aid by 2020. the money is intended to help the developing countries reduce carbon emissions and adapt to the effect of climate change. time is running out for the delegates to reach a deal. many divisions remain between the participants from the industrialized and developing nations. now it may be up to the ministers attending talks to steer the conference towards a successful conclusion. >>> chinese police hav
was flying near the senkaku islands in the south china sea. the defense ministry says the asdf spotted a wide 12 propellor aircraft on its radar. the plane was approaching from the north. it released f-15 fighter jets from the chinese prefecture. it flew within 120 kilometers of the islands but left without raiding japanese air space. the afdf dispatched fighters in response. a wide 12 aircraft also approached the islands last saturday but left without violating japan's air space. >>> a chinese think tank says it can't rule out the possibility of clashes breaking out between japan and china over territorial disputes. the government-affiliated chinese academy of social sciences released its assessment of the international situation in a report on monday. referring to the budget in japan, they reported china-japan is in the worst state. it adds that tensions could be eased through diplomatic channels. china has repeatedly sent ships into japanese waters around the senkaku, apparently to jeopardize japan and to recognize that opposition exists. china says japan's stubborn position could push it
from china as well as japan and south korea. he said he hopes the chinese can use their influence with their allies in pyongyang. >>> south korean foreign minister kim sung hwan has criticized north korea for spending more than $500 million on missile development. kim told a parliamentary committee that north korea is believed to have spent $400 million to build the tongchang-ri launch site and another $150 million for a missile plant outside pyongyang. unification minister yu woo-ik said the north has scheduled its next launch around the anniversary of the death of kim jong-il to enhance the authority of his son and successor, kim jong-un. yu said the north is also working to improve the reliability of its missile technology. >>> a highway operator in tokyo area has discovered a potential maintenance problem in one of its road tunnels near haneda airport. inspections by the metropolitan expressway company found one of the large rods used to hold up the tunnel's ceiling was broken. the emergency check comes three days after an expressway tunnel ceiling collapsed in yamanashi prefe
, china, egypt, venezuela and even a few more. but i'm looking out of the book and what i set out to do is look at the struggle between democrats and dictators. which you find this is a wonderful political science literature out there on the topic. but in fact, it's actually lived by people in the very concrete way on a day-to-day basis. just a couple hours before he came over here this morning, many people are profiled in russia were just arrested. this is a fluid stream of income late and i wanted to look at how these two sides are facing off against each other. one of the things i don't think we often realize is the battle between democracies and dictatorships going on today as opposed to the not so distant past is actually almost always die struggle between individuals. and so why did i choose the countries i chose? i chose them because these are some of the most sophisticated regimes. what you find as it's actually, i think you could guess this from 20 above and if you are in anyway following events. it's a very hard time to be a dictator. it's very difficult. this is not an easy g
ago, henry kissinger, then president nixon's national security advise secretly flew to china, beginning a string of meetings that would eventually open that isolated eastern nation to the western world. that opening checked soviet expansionism and in a sense was the beginning of the end of the cold war. >> this was the week that changed the world. >> it was also the beginning of china's entry into the world economy, which has resulted in that country becoming the world's second largest economy. >> red china's -- >> but back then, the idea of a reproachment with china would have been rejected as pure fantasy. china was a radical revolutionary communist regime that had been fighting america and its allies across the globe. how did the decision come about in the midst of such intense opposition? what were the internal maneuverings that paved the way? the secret dealings that made it actually happen? who better to ask than the man himself, dr. henry kissinger. >> this is what the world looked like when you enter into the white house with richard nixon. the united states has had n
in the field of science and technology. >>> china's new communist party leader has gone on his first tour since assuming the post last month. he's promising to carry on with the reforms of his predecessors. state-run china central television reported on xi's five-day trip. he laid flowers last saturday at the statue of the late leader. he said he'll push forward with reforms and with opening up china. xi appears to be following in dong's footsteps. the former leader visited the province 20 years ago and preached about accelerated reforms and more openness. >>> bankers are going through some troubled times these days. dirty money, bank rates manipulated, insider trading. ai joins us now from the business desk. ai. >> catherine, thanks. it seems bankers were a little too lax with their bankers. hsbc has agreed to pay a fine in the united states in connection with charges of money laundering. media reports say the fine will be the largest ever paid by a bank to u.s. authorities. hsbc admitted on tuesday its anti-money laundering measures had been inadequate. the bank agreed to pay the penalties to
such as china help keep labor costs low but demands for better treatment is rising and singaporians are struggling to agree on a response. nhk world's mark ho has this report. >> reporter: 171 chinese bus drivers wept on strike last month. they were unhappy over a disparity in pay rise compared to other workers. the walkout was the first in 26 years in singapore which has soviet rules against industrial action. >> translator: i hope the company will grant our request. if they don't, we will have to consider taking further steps. >> reporter: the government's response was swift and strong. 29 chinese strikers were deported. five leading members were arrested. one received a six-week prison sentence. the rare instance of labor and rest grabbed public attention. >> the whole thing that's happening with the chinese, it is kind of like, you know, freak thing that happened. >> reporter: singapore's 5.3 million residents, low-wage foreign workers account for one in six people. workers from china have been favored for their low-wage demands. they also share cultural heritage with singaporia
of k.f.c. and pizza hut says sales are slowing in china. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: the fiscal cliff talks are going nowhere. that's the word from john boehner today. the house speaker characterized the negotiations to avoid huge tax increases and spending cuts at a stalemate. the race to solve the fiscal cliff triggered another round of dramatic sound bites from republicans and president obama. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: the president is still pushing to wrap up a deal on the fiscal cliff before christmas and just in case anyone missed that point, he visited a toy factory to urge congress to avoid raising taxes on the middle class. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. a typical middle-class family of four would see their income taxes go up by about $2,200. >> reporter: t psidents oposg to raise taxesy $1.6 trillion, while cutting spending by $400 billion. on top of that, mr. obama asked for $50 billion more for infrastructure spending and $140 billion to extend unemployment insuranc
.5%. a representative of the chinese academy of social sciences said the economy will grow 7.7%. >> translator: china's exports are slowing because of the european debt crisis and the global economic slow down. >> li said economy bottomed out in the july through september quarter. the country's consumption and industrial output improved in september and october. he predicts growth will rebound next year to about 8.2%. he said increased public investment and more monetary easing would spur the economy. but li called for flexible government policies if the situation in europe gets worse. >>> the new leader of the chooeds communist party is sending out mixed signals. xi jinping says he wants to pursue a peaceful foreign policy. at the same time, china is locked in territorial disputes with japan and several southeast asian nations over islands in the east and south china seas. xi told a group of foreign academics in beijing that china poses neither a challenge nor a threat. >> translator: looking at china's history, cultural traditions, and current conditions, china will never adopt a policy of dominanc
will look at the new communist party of leadership in china and that impact on u.s.- china relations. hosted by the center for strategic and international studies in washington, this is an hour. i'd also like to recognize former ambassador to china jim sasser who's sitting right there, one of my close friends. thank you for coming, senator. glad to see you. well, the panel is a really good one, kurt campbell, assistant secretary of state for east asia and pacific affairs. he became -- came to that job in 2009, previously the ceo and co- founder of the center for a new american security. he was a professor at harvard, associate professor of public policy and international relations at the kennedy school. chris johnson, senior adviser and freeman chair in china studies here at csis. his most important public service, as far as i'm concerned, is he gave me a lot of help in preparing for the presidential debate. and i'll be -- always be grateful for that, chris. he's frequently advised senior white house, cabinet, congressional, military and foreign officials on chinese leadership and on beijing
-and-neck in manufacturing with china. now, that is a staggering statistic. we make 20% of the world's goods with about 10% of our economy. china makes about 20% of the world's goods with 40% of its economy. we are neck-and-neck as a manufacturer, and it's due to a six-time productivity advantage that we enjoy over china when it comes to manufacturing, and we even have a productivity advantage over countries like japan and germany, countries thought of as manufacturing leaders. i wondered, and i started asking myself, well, what is it that gives us this productivity advantage? what is it that gives american manufacturers this ability to compete? i wanted to go and talk to rail manufacturers because one of the things that when you're in washington and in bureaucracies, you know, you have a lot of people pontificating about the state of american manufacturing and what we need to do without actually engaging and talking to manufacturers, and, particularly, not talking to small and medium-sized manufacturers. the large manufacturers, the ceos, are often represented on policy think tanks, but the reality is al
exchanging views with ambassadors from japan, the u.s., china and russia. she has already started moving to form her government. she'll meet with members of the present administration to go over issues. a transfer commission will finalize her policies. then in february she'll officially become the first woman in south korea to be president. >>> voters in south korea thought about the power of conglomerates when they cast ballots. many are frustrated that the big business blocks are elbowing out small and medium-size companies. they want their next president to level the playing field. we'll take a more in-depth look into that issue on friday. >>> japan's next leader has been dialing up the pressure on central bankers. he says they need to do more to shore up the economy. officials at the bank of japan emerged from two days of meeting and agreed to pump money into the economy for the fifth time this year. policymakers decided to add 10 trillion yen or $120 billion to the bank's asset-buying program. they plan to add $60 billion to buy up long-term government bonds. they will spend another
and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
their claims to territory. chinese commanders are doing more to make their presence known in the south china sea. they're beefing up their equipment as others beef up their forces. they've deployed a patrol vessel off the southern province for the first time. the maritime safety administration launched this ship, running more than 90 meters long. it has a heli pad. china is locked in territorial disputes with several countries. diplomats are expected to react strongly to deployment of a larger ship. >>> commanders in the philippines are trying to bolster their control over some islands in the south china sea. they've begun staging elite marps on the islands. senior military officials say they started deploying marines in october. they had already stationed naval officers there. the commanders say they've almost doubled the number of personnel on some of the islands. the marines underwent training to protect the territory and carrying upgraded weapons. the military is expanding a facility on the island of lawok. to manage threats from china and from north korea. the new defense minister has r
of other countries most notably china. it's great to have you on the show. you made the case, but at the end of the day the real challenge is staring us right in the face, china india and the developing nations. unless we dramatically encourage a shift in the way they consume energy, our individual efforts aren't necessarily go to aggregate into anything significant, is that fair? >> absolutely. china has already put out twice as many gasses as the u.s. in 2012. while our emissions are going down, china is growing at 10% of the year. if all of this was to cease to exist, china would make up for that in three and a half years. >> it doesn't matter what we do here. if we set an example by spending money and china can't afford to follow that example and we can't afford to subsidize that example, then that example is not much good. we need something that can be done in china. then we would both believe any solution has to be focused on the developing world because that is where--i'm not putting blame on anybody. they have every right in my mind to develop. i would love to see the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,997 (some duplicates have been removed)

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